Posted: March 28, 2013 in Blogs

Originally posted on Cooperative Catalyst:

[This post originally appeared at]

In the first part of his new book Present Shock, media theorist Douglas Rushkoff explains how we have come to a “now-ist” “presentism” resulting in “narrative collapse.” If I understand him correctly, Rushkoff argues that new media, social change, and technologies make traditional story-telling untenable. While we are accustomed to stories that fit the mold of Campbell’s hero, we are no longer able to use or enjoy them (or any new Star Wars movie?) because

  1. We have become too self-conscious to consume narratives uncritically (see everything from Beavis and Butthead to MSTK3000 to Community). [These references and the following are Rushkoff’s.]
  2. We have become more interested in current individual performance (see the itinerant NBA star) than collective group history (see baseball rivalries).
  3. Our pop storytellers in news and entertainment have reduced (betrayed?) storytelling to the serial exploitation and…

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Rickshaw driver in Jogjakarta

Rickshaw driver in Jogjakarta

Image  —  Posted: December 2, 2012 in Blogs, Photography


Posted: December 2, 2012 in Blogs


My she-tiger, the eccentric Azumi.

Back to blogging

Posted: December 2, 2012 in Blogs

After a hiatus from blogging, I am back. Work, friends, the offline world has stolen me from blogdom for six months, but I think I am back. There have been times when I wish I had never quit blogging but I guess I needed some perspective and some prioritising and value-checking to do. 

I am not sure what shape the blog will take from down on, but having a tete-a-tete with the hereafter will definitely have an impact on what I think and say and how I say it.


PS. This was shown when I pressed the Publish button:
“Don’t try to figure out what other people want to hear from you; figure out what you have to say. It’s the one and only thing you have to offer.” Barbara Kingsolver